Picture
Hundreds of thousands of imported goods are crammed in to the Haitian market every single day.. They dock at the warf right across from what appears to be one of the busiest public markets of the country- Croixbossale.  Fruits and vegetables spill on to the streets as you glance into the market. On the left end stands a slaughter house – where goats and cows are slaughtered right on the spot for an audience.The pungent odor seeps into everything around you.  It seems the rotten fruit, fresh fruit and fecal matter of freshly butchered animals have an aroma best described as repulsive. To the far right sit truckload of used clothing literally mounds upon mounds- piled on top of each other appearing to have spilled un to the ground without a care

But the story does not end there. It continues, the work continues. While Haiti’s is in-undated with imported good which span from China to Alaska productivity lies within these walls. Haitian Entrepreneurs manufacturing   local goods while scarce in comparison to the developing market are definitely on the rise.

Just down the street from a busy shore of imports sits an encouraging atelier. An atelier created by five recent graduate of HPCD incubator program. A program which works with women/ men  for 12-24 months , which equips them with business skills , provides a space of production for their small businesses,  and funding to recapitalize their businesses.  

Right before you make it Martissant at Fontamara 41. The small shop is entitled “Atleye fanm an development pou lavni” Which translates a women’s atelier in development for the future.  On the third floor of a complex is a quaint space with five spacious rooms where a conglomerate is beginning to taking shape. These women are not only using material available within the local market they are recycling and creating innovative products and craft. Louisna, a leader within the team – which creates jewelry from recycled material, Micheline Deciuse,a constant force,  creates table mats and bags and knick knacks from recycled cheeco wrappers and agro ailimentaire  such as such as peanut butter and cremas,  Rosa Mica- who produces macramé and leather sandal ,and Judithe who produces all sorts of crocheted garments. What sets these women apart their tenacity to keep striving,to continue to impact their community by showcasing their talent.

 “ this is only the beginning, we have great plans- we want not only to showcase are carefully crafted good, but to teach other within our community, grow this vision not only for the  development of this shop but for the future of this nation” Louisna explained.

To import or to create- while at times the two walk hand in hand- I prefer the latter.





Leave a Reply.